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New technology will make it possible to examine the salt balance in the Arctic Ocean and thereby uncover signs of climate change that we might be overlooking today. (Photo: Colourbox)

2020.09.08 | AU Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering

New invention measures glacier water in the Arctic Ocean

Engineers from Aarhus University have developed a device that makes it possible to collect water samples from the Arctic Ocean at depths of 300 metres. This will help climate researchers acquire new knowledge about how the ice in the northern hemisphere is melting and what happens when it mixes with the salty seawater

Associate Professor Qi Zhang is leading the group, which has developed a new way of compressing data. The new grant will provide a framework for an end-to-end solution that could have a major impact on the so-called data tsunami, caused by exponential growth in IoT devices. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto.

2020.08.25 | AU Engineering, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Danish researchers invent a new way to compress data

A new project, supported by Independent Research Fund Denmark, will make it possible to read data directly from compressed IoT data. The project is being headed by researchers from Aarhus University and it is a collaboration with, among others, MIT and Boston University.

Congratulations to Till Böttjer (left) and Johan Krogshave (right) who won the Best Paper Award at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers IDETC/CIE 2020 Conference in July. Their supervisor was Assistant Professor Devarajan Ramanujan (middle). Photo: Jesper Bruun

2020.08.24 | AU Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Best Paper Award: Till Böttjer and Johan Krogshave

PhD Student Till Böttjer and MSc in Engineering Johan Krogshave recently won the Best Paper Award for their research on energy consumption in milling processes at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) IDETC/CIE 2020 Conference.

Biomanufacturing Project House is a new biotech initiative that will attract graduate students to Scandinavia's largest bioindustrial cluster in Kalundborg. Photo: AP Pension

2020.08.21 | AU Engineering, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering

Aarhus University helping new biotech initiative in Kalundborg

Kalundborg is to be the focal point for the Biomanufacturing Project House (BPH), to attract engineering Master's students from Denmark and abroad and strengthen Kalundborg’s leading position in biotech. The board at the BPH includes Lars Ditlev Mørck Ottosen, head of department at Aarhus University.

Birgit Bonefeld researches into making sustainable clothes out of locally grown grass. That won't solve the fundamental challenge of pollution in the fashion industry though, she says. Photo: Ida Jensen, AU Foto.

2020.08.13 | AU Engineering, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering

She researches into making clothes out of grass

Birgit Bonefeld is one of Denmark's only researchers into sustainable textiles: a very important area in the green transition, and one which may also become an important part of agricultural conversion to grass production to reduce nutrient leaching and replace imports of soy protein.

"Basically, what I’m doing is trying to find out why the world looks and works the way it does," says Marcelo Dias, newly appointed associate professor at the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto.

2020.08.11 | AU Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering

"Mathematics is the best language we have to describe nature"

Marcelo Dias is a newly appointed associate professor at the Department of Engineering at Aarhus University. He researches into mechanical metamaterials and soft matter physics and he has a penchant for slightly more unconventional areas within engineering science, such as the wondrous patterns of nature.

The research group AiR (Artificial Intelligence in Robotics) at Aarhus University is working on designing a fully autonomous drone which can beat the best human pilot in a race, using sophisticated AI techniques. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto.

2020.08.06 | AU Engineering, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Fast & furious: Autonomous drone racing raises the bar for artificial intelligence

Today, drones can autonomously carry out various tasks with zero or minimum involvement by human operators. However, they need to fly as slow as possible to sense their environment and plan future actions. But what if drones need to fly fast like in a manual drone race where speed, agility, and performance are paramount? A team of researchers from…

A new test bench will make it possible to measure the impact of forces on the giant wind turbines of the future and simulate their wear and lifecycle. (Photo: Colourbox).
The Danish company, R&D Test Systems, is behind one of today's largest and most advanced test benches for wind turbines. The test bench weighs 4,000 tonnes, has a 1,500 m2 concrete foundation, and contains 200 tonnes of reinforced steel. It is currently at the Lindø Offshore Renewables Center (LORC). (Photo: R&D Test Systems)

2020.08.12 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Danish engineers to build the world's largest test bench for wind turbines

A huge test bench for nacelles will make it possible to build even bigger wind turbines in the future.