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"The idea is to use friction and compression to create spatial structures with no mortar. Simply blocks that are held together by the laws of physics," says Assistant Professor Valentina Beatini. Photo: Lars Kruse / AU Foto.

2019.11.06 | Department of Engineering

Creating anticlastic architecture using Newton’s laws

Valentina Beatini, architect from the University of Genoa and PhD from the University of Parma, is a new assistant professor at the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University. Her research is focused on building strange shape constructions using high friction masonry.

The new revolutionary technology allows for unprecedented efficiency in measuring many different atomic components outside the laboratory. This is the first time that NMR technology has been used in the agricultural sector, but a great future is predicted for the technology. Photo: Tavs Nyord

2019.11.05 | Department of Engineering

Danish-developed, award-winning slurry sensor to make agriculture more sustainable

Researchers from the Department of Engineering have helped develop a sensor to measure the nutrient content in manure using NMR technology. The technology has just won a major, international award and has been lauded as one of the 40 most important agricultural inventions of the year.

Woutijn Johannes Baars is a new assistant professor at the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University. Throughout his PhD and research in the US and Australia he has focused on fighter jet noise - and in particular how to reduce it. Photo: Jesper Bruun.

2019.10.22 | Department of Engineering

Turbulence and noise expert at Aarhus University to research fighter jet thunder

The Department of Engineering at Aarhus University, has recruited Assistant Professor Woutijn Baars, who has been working on noise from supersonic jets with US-based collaborators, and who comes with many years of research expertise on how best to avoid this fighter jet noise.

New tech from (among other) the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University, and the Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania lets aerial drones completely take over the film directing. Photo: Erdal Kayacan
"Today, commercial autonomous drone products usually follow the clear, safe path behind the actor allowing only for a continuous backshot. That’s not very interesting," says Associate Professor Erdal Kayacan, who's leading the Danish part of the project. Photo: Erdal Kayacan.

2019.10.20 | Department of Engineering

Can a robot become a movie director?

International team of researchers develop a fully autonomous cinematography system for aerial drones with the aim of letting the onboard artificial intelligence completely take over the film directing.

Large, larger, largest is not necessarily the best when it comes to wind turbines new research from Aarhus University suggests. Photo: Colourbox.

2019.10.17 | Department of Engineering

Computer models show clear advantages in new types of wind turbines

Researchers have modelled the fluid dynamics of multi-rotor wind turbines, and how they interact in wind farms. The research demonstrates a clear advantage for a turbine model with four rotors.

"If we want a truly sustainable built environment, we need to look at the bigger picture. We cannot focus on energy renovation alone," says Aliakbar Kamari, who is researching in tectonic building design at the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University. Photo: Aliakbar Kamari.

2019.10.16 | Department of Engineering

Best Paper Award: Aliakbar Kamari

Postdoc and architectural engineer Aliakbar Kamari recently won the Best Paper Award for his research in developing a sustainability-focused tool for rapidly generating and evaluating holistic renovation scenarios.

Mogens Hinge from Aarhus University visits the Aage Vestergaard Larsen (AVL) recycling company in Mariager. With head of business development at AVL, Gitte Buk Larsen, he is inspecting a new plastic granulate. Photo: Britta Fischer Mogensen
... And in this picture they are looking at used plastic pipes. Photo: Britta Fischer Mogensen

2019.10.09 | Department of Engineering

New knowledge about old plastics

There is a huge number of different plastic types. This means it is no easy matter to get the rate of plastics recycling to rise. At the Department of Engineering, daily tests on plastics will make it easier for industry to identify the specific type of plastic and produce recycled plastic products in the right quality. Learn more about the…

"One of the more interesting things I'm working on is bioelectronic devices, a field where electronics and biology come together. Here we try to encapsulate biocompatible 3D printed electronic in human cells," says Shweta Agarwala, a new assistant professor at Aarhus University. Photo: Lars Kruse / AU Foto.

2019.10.03 | Department of Engineering

World of opportunities with Printed Electronics in Denmark

Shweta Agarwala, MSc in engineering from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and PhD in electronics engineering from the National University of Singapore, is a new assistant professor at the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University. Her research focus is printed electronics catered towards finding novel healthcare solutions.

Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a super-plastic material commercially known as Dyneema or Spectra, which is already taking over from Kevlar in e.g. bullet-proof jackets, which PhD Simon Skovsgård is wearing here. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto. Bullet-proof jacket lent by Grejfreak.dk

2019.10.01 | Department of Engineering

New research identifies the strengths and weaknesses of super material

Scientists from Aarhus University and the University of Cambridge are the first to measure and set guidelines for bolted joints using the up-coming replacement for Kevlar: the ultra-strong material with the catchy name ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

"The objective is for the technology to be cost-effective at a scale suited to a large biogas plant. The ultimate goal is a society where nothing goes to waste. Where no fossil fuels are dug out of the ground, and we have an alternative for everything we dig up today. The circular bioeconomy at its best," says Lars Ottosen. Photo: AU Foto.

2019.09.26 | Department of Engineering

Danish research to make black-as-coal methanol production 100% green

Every year, more than 70 million tonnes of methanol are produced in a process based almost exclusively on fossil fuels. A new project with Haldor Topsøe, Aarhus University and others is aiming at making production entirely green and based on biogas.

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