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"No one in the industry knows where this very restrictive standard text comes from. A look at the measurements and trials conducted in recent years reveals that this doesn’t really make sense," says Professor (Docent) Kenny Kataoka (left), who's digging deep in ancient Danish building codes together with PhD Student Jannie Knudsen (right). Photo: Jesper Bruun.

2019.04.02 | Department of Engineering

The strange case of bored piles

Since 1977, Danish standards for foundations have been extremely restrictive with regard to using bored piles as foundations for buildings and other structures. But are bored piles really as inefficient as the standards imply? A new research project is digging into the matter.

"The goal is to lower costs and for more sustainable production, and clearly this will ultimately benefit Danish district-heating customers," says Associate Professor Steffen Petersen from the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University. Photo: Colourbox.

2019.03.28 | Department of Engineering

New technology to provide cheaper and greener district heating

Aarhus University is involved in a major new business partnership aiming to revolutionise Danish district heating.

"We investigated the mechanism of roughness creation, and we propose it has to do with subsurface crack propagation and material removal at different scales," says Assistant Professor Ramin Aghababaei on the project. Photo: Lars Kruse / AU Foto

2019.03.27 | Department of Engineering

A new first: Scientists mimic Nature’s self-affinity using computer simulations

For the first time ever, researchers have simulated the process of surface roughness creation: a step forward in understanding the emergence of fractal characteristic of rough surfaces on many scales ranging from atomic to geological scales – and maybe a step forward in earthquake prediction.

"We just need a sort of index of how the picture is built up. Like the instructions for a Lego kit. A detailed list of how to put the picture together with bits from other pictures," says Associate Professor Daniel Lucani Rötter. Photo: Peer Klercke.

2019.03.22 | Department of Engineering

Deatomizing the web: New project tackles the bottleneck of superfast cloud computing

Access is becoming a growing bottleneck for a speedy internet. A new project aims to help reduce the amount of storage space needed for every single file on the web.

Aarhus University has received 37 per cent more applications for engineering programmes through quota 2. Photo: Melissa Bach Yildirim, AU Foto.

2019.03.19 | AU Engineering

Rise in applicants for engineering programmes at Aarhus University

More than ever have applied for an engineering programme at Aarhus University via quota 2. IT programmes are particularly popular.

"Our research laboratory is of key importance for our researchers and students. We are extremely grateful to Keysight and to the Foundation for their donation to support the establishment of this world-wide centre dedicated to research and development of next-generation wireless transceivers," said Prof. Domenico Zito. Photo: Lars Kruse / AU Foto.

2019.03.11 | Department of Engineering

New world-class research laboratory opens at Aarhus University

The new state-of-the-art international facility will enable the innovative development of wireless transceiver technology for next-generation communications

"Our study shows that large-scale infrastructure choices, such as back-up power plant capacity, are relatively unaffected by the level of climate change," says PhD fellow Smail Kozarcanin (right). Here along side his colleague Associate Professor Gorm Bruun Andresen.

2019.03.08 | Department of Engineering

Good news! Europe's electric grid will still work even as the world crumbles

Scientists at Aarhus University in Denmark studying the effects of climate change on weather-dependent electricity systems have found a silver lining in Earth's otherwise fraught future outlook.

"The biggest problem with these milling tools is that the edges are so worn down after just an hour milling that the tool has to be replaced," says Assistant Professor Ramin Aghababaei, who's leading the AU part of the Cutting-Edge project.

2019.03.07 | Department of Engineering

New project to develop the milling tools of the future

Innovation Fund Denmark has invested DKK 7 million in the new Cutting-Edge project that will increase the lifetime of industrial milling tools.

Lars Ditlev Mørck Ottosen, head of the chemical and biotechnology section at the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University, here seen at the research center AU Foulum. Photo: AU Foto.

2019.02.25 | Department of Engineering

AU researchers develop the carbon-free fuel of the future from air, water and electricity

A major new research project will revolutionise production of ammonia, which is an essential ingredient in fertilisers. At the same time, the project will demonstrate the potential of ammonia as the future carbon-free fuel.

Thomas Tørrings research team has been collecting soil samples from several Danish Natura 2000 sites like Rold Skov, Rebild Bakker, Slette Strand and Mols Bjerge. All of whom have unique bacterial flora. Photo: Lars Kruse / AU Foto.

2019.02.10 | Department of Engineering

The hunt is on: using machine learning, we’re looking for completely new antibiotics in national parks

In about 20-30 years, bacterial resistance will be so serious that it will cost more lives than cancer, even in the West. This is the gloomy prophecy from the World Health Organization (WHO), and they are beating the drum for active, targeted efforts to find new antibiotics. A researcher from the Department of Engineering at Aarhus University has…

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