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News

2017.12.12 | AU Engineering

Aarhus University opens large new innovation factory

Engineering students are full of good ideas that can help solve some of the world’s many problems. The Aarhus University School of Engineering is therefore kicking off a new initiative that – in collaboration with researchers and companies – will get the students’ ideas to flourish.

Grass can be turned into feed, fuel and valuable chemicals. But how do you optimise biomass and make the most efficient use of it for new products? Ib Johansen (left) and Morten Ambye-Jensen are spearheading the university’s research into biorefining technologies. (Photo: AU Communication)
By very precisely regulating pressure and temperature conditions, Ib Johansen can convert grass to oil in the present demonstration facility. The biomass is led through a 120-metre-long pipe, where it is heated to approximately 450 degrees and subjected to pressure corresponding to 350 bar. The process removes oxygen from the biomass and changes the relationship between hydrogen and carbon. (Photo: AU Communication)

2017.12.07 | AU Engineering

Researchers will turn grass into a gold mine

With a multi-million grant, researchers can speed up development of the world’s largest and most advanced biorefinery facility. Here they will convert ordinary grass to feed, food products, fuel and plastic.

Daniel Enrique Lucani Rötter is a new Sapere Aude research leader under the Danish Council for Independent Research. His appointment includes a grant to strengthen research into data compression and storage in the Internet of the future. (Photo: AU Communication)

2017.11.24 | AU Engineering

Sapere Aude grant for research into the Internet of the future

The Internet is undergoing a degree of change that only a few can imagine. The flow of information is in explosive growth, and this places extreme demands on the way we compress and store data. Researchers are now getting started on the creation of completely new conditions for communication between humans and things in the network.

This is what it looks like when artificial intelligence takes over the design process in building construction. Lasse Rahbek’s computer program has identified an optimal grid-scale construction than can solve impossible engineering and architectural tasks, at the same time as significantly reducing material consumption in the construction. (Photo: Martin Gravgaard)

2017.11.24 | AU Engineering

Super design for buildings based on artificial intelligence

Computing power is now so strong that it can design building constructions with such a degree of perfection that architects and engineers have to give up. Students are responsible for the super algorithm that controls everything, and could revolutionise building procedures when it is launched early next year.

The tiny robot is powered via energy harvested from ultrasonic waves using a piezoelectric device. This will be one of the major engineering challenges in the project, Farshad Moradi explains.

2017.11.08 | AU Engineering

New project will fight Parkinson’s disease with LED brain implants

Aarhus University researchers have just launched a multi-million euro project that aims to use micro-scale implants inside the living brain to cure movement disorders.

Aarhus University’s studies show that hydrogen sulphide emissions come from slurry evaporation from pig and cattle sheds in particular. Photo: Colourbox

2017.11.08 | AU Engineering

Atmospheric sulphur also comes from farming

Researchers have been able for the first time to identify the extent to which manure contributes to the atmospheric content of sulphur.

The three engineering students building the physical version of the computer game are (from left): Carl Arnkil, Mads R. Thomsen and Chris Graversen.

2017.10.13 | AU Engineering

Aarhus engineers build mega-sized quantum problems

A bunch of bachelor students from Mechanical Engineering at Aarhus University are in full swing building a physical version of a very special computer game. They hope to get lots of people to play the game – because this is the only way to finish off the monster computer hidden away in the basement below the university.

Here are the five Aarhus University students with Kåre Jensen at far right at work on building the Delphini-1 satellite in a clean room with strict rules for dust and pollution. Photo: Lars Kruse

2017.09.28 | AU Engineering

He builds satellites – when every boy’s dream comes true

After three days in the clean room, five Aarhus University students finished building the Delphini-1 satellite, which will be sent into orbit next year as part of the university’s space programme. One of the five is Kåre Jensen, who is busy studying engineering.

Reality is not what it was. Aarhus University is now heading for digital horizons with a strategic research centre aimed at creating new recognitions and knowledge about important aspects of the digital reality of the future.

2017.09.27 | AU Engineering

Aarhus University will boost digital understanding

Progress in electronic technologies during the last five decades has fundamentally changed society on a global scale, and has been of radical importance for industry and business. The digital ‘revolution’ is in full swing, and will only escalate in the coming years. Denmark is in a good position at the front and, with the establishment of a…

Photos: Agata Ewa Lenczewska-Madsen

2017.09.11 | AU Engineering

Engineers get patients and health care workers to communicate better

In a short space of time, a group of engineering students at Aarhus University created a new IT system for the Spinal Cord Injury Centre of Western Denmark. This raises the level of communication between health care workers, patients and relatives.

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