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News

The farming of the future will be fully automated This means that farmers will no longer need to drive their tractors themselves. (Photo: Colourbox)

2017.01.16 | Public / media, AU Engineering

Danish engineers in huge EU project to show the farming of the future

Farming is facing a paradigm shift in which smart IT solutions will modernise the industry and make it more efficient. The EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation is granting hundreds of millions to a large demonstration project to boost development.

New technology will monitor and limit ammonia emission from livestock production. This will solve a major environmental problem in farming. Pictured here are Anders Feilberg and Quyhn Nguyen in the laboratory. They are working on chemical methods for cleaning the air. (Photo: Lars Kruse)

2017.01.05 | AU Engineering

New technology will reduce air pollution from farming

New sensors and technology for purifying the air will make it possible for farmers to control ammonia emission and remediate odour from livestock production.

Using time-resolved data from 28,000 Danish single-family houses, researchers can document that the current national energy requirements have a significant impact in terms of reducing heating consumption. (Photo: Colourbox)
Martin Kristensen (left) and Steffen Petersen are responsible for the extensive analysis of our district heating consumption, which clearly shows the impact of national energy regulations. (Photo: Martin Kristensen)

2016.12.13 | AU Engineering

Danes use less energy on heating

With data from 28,000 single-family houses, researchers have analysed the historical development of our actual energy consumption for heating private houses. They can thereby document a clear effect of energy-saving requirements in the current building regulations.

A group of engineering students has designed a smart lid for coffee, which stops you from burning your tongue when you drink. (Photo: Colourbox)
At left in this image is a standard lid for a to-go mug. At right is the first version of a lid with features that have been thoroughly thought out from an engineering point of view. It is designed with a starting point in fluid mechanical and thermodynamic principles with a view to improving the coffee experience for consumers. (Photo: Adam Flytkjær)

2016.12.06 | AU Engineering

Smart lid on the way for coffee drinkers

A specially designed lid can solve the problem of burning your tongue when you drink hot coffee. A group of engineering students is behind the invention and they have just started production of the first prototype.

Aarhus University is opening its energy laboratory in Katrinebjerg on Friday 2 December. (Photo: Lars Kruse)
The laboratory can be used by researchers, students and companies. The aim is to gain experimental experience with an energy system based on full integration of sustainable energy sources such as the sun, wind and biogas. (Photo: Lars Kruse)
The RESCUE Lab is self-sufficient with energy from the sun, wind and biogas, and also has the capacity to store energy. This image is taken on the roof, which is equipped with solar cells. (Photo: Lars Kruse)

2016.12.01 | AU Engineering

New energy laboratory opens in Aarhus

A new energy laboratory at Aarhus University will provide new knowledge about how to optimise a sustainable electricity supply in Denmark and the rest of Europe. Both researchers and students, as well as companies in Denmark and abroad will have access to the state-of-the-art technical facilities.

Attendees from more than 140 Danish companies who gathered at the Navitas Building on Thursday showed great interest in the theme for the Industry 4.0 Conference (Photo: Maria Randima, Aarhus University)
Minister for Higher Education and Science Ulla Tørnæs took part in the conference. Here she is being shown around Navitas with Dean Niels Chr. Nielsen. (Photo: Maria Randima, Aarhus University)

2016.11.07 | AU Engineering

Full house at Navitas for Industry 4.0 Conference

More than 200 participants from leading Danish technology companies and knowledge institutions attended the conference and workshops at Aarhus University on Thursday 3 November.

AU Engineering’s new tech space is located at Katrinebjerg. Students and companies will work together here to learn about the practical side of advanced technological issues. (Photo: Lars Kruse)

2016.11.04 | AU Engineering

AU Engineering opens new tech space

AU Engineering is opening a new laboratory – the Orbit Lab – packed with advanced technological hardware. The Orbit Lab is an offer to the university’s brightest and most creative IT and engineering students.

Jens Vinge Nygaard specialises in classical mechanics. Using mathematical models, he can predict the development of a cancer tumour. (Photo: Lise Balsby) 
This image shows a cancer tumour located on the foot of a mouse. It contains more than 15,000 vascular branches. The colours show the diameter of the blood vessels. (Laboratory photo: Jens Vinge Nygaard)

2016.10.14 | AU Engineering

Danish researchers behind new cancer images

By combining two different scanning technologies, researchers have succeeded in creating completely new and detailed images of cancer tumours in mice. This could eventually pave the way for the development of more effective drugs.

In the coming years, researchers will develop new technology that can accommodate the world’s growing need for computers that are even smaller, faster and more energy-efficient. With a prestigious EU research grant, they will establish a completely new technological foundation for the electronics of the future.

2016.10.10 | AU Engineering

Large grant for developing the electronics of the future

Aarhus University researchers are starting a major European research project this month. The aim is to develop new technology for the electronics of the future.

The new batch of engineers were presented with their diplomas on 1 July. Here is the group of MSc graduates. (Photo: Henrik Olsen)
Caribey Esen, who just completed his Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Power Technology. (Photo: Aarhus University)
Sine Grønne Karlsen, who graduated as a mechanical engineer. (Photo: Aarhus University)
Five happy MSc graduates. From left: Andreas Høst Poulsen (Civil and Architectural Engineering), Bhagat Banwait (Biotechnology), Line Knøss (Chemistry), Line Aggerbo (Computer Engineering) and Mikkel Andersen (Civil and Architectural Engineering). (Photo: Henrik Olsen)

2016.08.18 | AU Engineering

Congratulations to the new engineering graduates

On Friday 1 July, diplomas were awarded to a new batch of engineers from Aarhus University. The event was followed by speeches and sparkling wine.

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