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For many years, carbon dioxide has been released into the atmosphere as pollution. But we might have to change the way we think about this greenhouse gas and see it instead as a valuable resource in our energy production. The reason for this is that researchers can transform the greenhouse gas into clean and sustainable methane gas that can subsequently be stored and distributed through our existing natural gas grid. (Photo: Colourbox)
Researchers from the Department of Engineering at Aarhus University are behind the world’s most comprehensive pilot tests of high-temperature electrolysis, and the technology seems promising. In just a few years, it will be possible to roll out the technology throughout Denmark. It will cover one-tenth of our total energy need, while considerably reducing emissions of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The photograph shows Christian Dannesboe, PhD Fellow (Photo: digitaltdrivhus.dk)

2018.07.25 | AU Engineering

Researchers from Department of Engineering transform carbon dioxide into green super gas

The primary ingredients are water, power from wind turbines and a large amount of carbon dioxide that would otherwise have to be released straight into the atmosphere. The result is an artificially produced version of natural gas with a huge green potential.

[Translate to English:] Ingeniøruddannelser på Aarhus Universitet er populære. I år er det især diplomingeniøruddannelsen i Kemi, der går frem. (Foto: Peer Klercke, AU Engineering, arkiv)
Elektrisk energiteknologi er en af årets store højdespringere. (Foto: Lars Kruse, AU Engineering, arkiv)

2018.07.25 | AU Engineering

Promising admission of new engineering students

The steady growth in the number of applicants for the engineering degree programmes at Aarhus University continues.

Michael Misbih and Thomas Holm Nielsen have taught their computer to count the number of bees with mites. And the computer can do this quickly and accurately, without hurting as much as an antennae on the bees. (Photo: Jesper Bruun)

2018.07.05 | AU Engineering

Engineering students count parasitic mites in an instant

Parasitic mites are one of the main reasons why the death rate for honey bees in Denmark is increasing. Now, two engineering students have developed a system that makes it possible to map the extent of the problem, and at the same time reduce pesticide consumption.